frenuloplasty

This topic contains 3 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  jake_w 16 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #57 Reply

    jake_w

    frenuloplasty

    Hello Jim, I am glad to see this site again. I just started stretching, even took some pictures (bad quality, but at least they give an idea about the situation). Anyway, I am not aware does the foreskin tend to restore itself to its original condition (shrink) if you have stretched it for let’s say two months, and then you stop. Do I have to do maintaining exercises forerer? I know it’s still early to think about that, I just want to have as much information as possible. If stretching doesn’t work (I mostly need to stretch the frenulum because it is causing a curve by pulling the glans down) my last option would be a frenuloplasty. I found out about this minor surgery on the net. I’ve asked my urologist about it. He claimed it’s harmless, it could only help and I won’t loose any sensitivity afterwards (but he said the same about circumsicion too). Do you also think so? I don’t want surgery, but I don’t want this new curve either, I am quite confused.

  • #58 Reply

    Jim

    Excellent question

    The answer is yes and no. The reason is that when you exert tension upon the skin, small voids are created that must be filled in with new growth. That takes time. Therefore, even after the optimum stretch has been achieved, stretching must continue to allow for the growth of cells. You’ll need to determine that time frame through your own experience.

    Skin may have a tendency to recede in some areas of the body as we see it do when fat people lose weight. However, in this instance, you are going to be using the parts over the rest of your life, so the odds of something like that happening would be nearly non-existant. Exceptions would be complication with yeast or other infections.

    So, your final answer is still yes and no. While you will not need to make deliberate attempts at stretching, it will be advisable for you to retract the skin regularly in order to keep it supple.

  • #59 Reply

    jake_w

    glans sensitivity

    Is it the frenulum that is the most sensitive part of the penis, or is it the area of the glans right under the frenulum? I’ve read opinions online, some of them say it is the frenulum, some say it is the downside of the glans. I am stretching now and I notice that I can grab both ends of the frenulum with two fingers of one hand and with two fingers of the other hand and stretch it apart with quiet amazing force before I feel discomfort or pain, so I wonder is it so sensitive after all?

  • #60 Reply

    Paul B.

    Mais Oui, mais Non!

    > Is it the frenulum that is the most sensitive part of the penis, or is it the area of the glans right under the frenulum? I’ve read opinions online, some of them say it is the frenulum, some say it is the downside of the glans. I am stretching now and I notice that I can grab both ends of the frenulum with two fingers of one hand and with two fingers of the other hand and stretch it apart with quiet amazing force before I feel discomfort or pain, so I wonder is it so sensitive after all?

    And <i>yet again</i> comes back that spooky reply: “Yes, – but no!”.

    If one is going to be honest, many, <i>most</i> of the matters we discuss here are not cut-and-dried, not absolutes. <i>If</i> you were to have surgery on your fraenulum, or even a circumcision, it wouldn’t necessarily spell the end of your sex life. But it <i>might</i> just be the “last straw” in some way or other, and perhaps later if not immediately, because it <i>would</i> make a difference, small, perhaps not so small. We are indicating that the difference is <i>unlikely</i> to be an <i>improvement</i> because surgery of necessity causes <i>damage</i> and what we suggest by preference results in whatever improvement in function you may desire, <i>without</i> that damage.

    If we’re going to talk about whether some part of the body is <i>sensitive</i> or not, then let’s understand that there are about five different types of nerves (or receptors) that monitor touch in your skin, <i>plus</i> those for heat and cold. How much you can stretch that piece of skin before it objects, is in <i>no</i> way an indication of its <i>sensitivity</i> in a sexual sense just as your fingertips are both very sensitive, and very tough and durable. In mentioning it though, you have made it clear that the tightness as such in your fraenulum and foreskin is by <i>no</i> means a problem, so we now know your concern is cosmetic only.

    Sensitivity to touch is more usually defined by what is the <i>lightest</i> touch a given area can detect, as well as what <i>discrimination</i> the skin has, which can be measured by how close it is possible to discern two points (of a caliper) touching the skin simultaneously, from one alone.

    Even so, that is not really relevant to the thing about which you are <i>really</i> concerned – response to <i>sexual stimulation</i>. This is where Masters and Johnson got it badly wrong when they “researched” the sensitivity of circumcised and uncircumcised men and concluded that the “sensitivity” of the penis head was the same in both cases. Since the two-point discrimination and touch threshold (which latter I suspect they did <i>not</i> measure with any precision at all) are going to show as the same because there are still the same <i>number</i> of nerves present in each case, they missed entirely the matter of the quantity and quality of sensations which result from <i>actual</i> sexual stimulation.

    Now to focus back on the first part of your question, you are simply asking the <i>wrong</i> question. What the <i>most</i> sensitive part of the penis is, doesn’t matter a hoot! You have to assume that for sexual function, you want <i>all</i> of it! If you <i>remove</i> something, your fraenulum, or your foreskin, then certainly, there is another part left that is still sensitive, and you can still have sex, but you’ve removed a <i>part</i> of it, so some <i>part</i> of the sensation is going to be missing.

    In fact, I personally <i>don’t</i> think the fraenulum is <i>itself</i> particularly sensitive, nor that it contains a <i>large</i> number of nerves. It contains a small artery which tends to bleed if you cut it. <i>However</i> the area around the fraenulum <i>is</i> probably the most <i>pleasurably</i> sensitive part of the penis – if for example, you direct a water shower on either the underside or the top side of the penis, I think you will find the underside more pleasant, and similarly if you are so fortunate as to have a partner <i>lick</i> one or the other.

    What the fraenulum <i>does</i>, is to tie the foreskin to the underneath of the urethral meatus (pee hole) which is part of that particularly sensitive area. It quite simply <i>conveys</i> movement from the foreskin to that part, and this is the very <i>same</i> function as the crura (branches) of the labia minora (inside lips) of women which connect to the sides of the clitoris – they convey movement of the lips to the clitoris, in most cases the <i>only</i> way that women actually receive clitoral sensation from intercourse (since the clitoris is <i>not</i> in most cases, directly touched).

    If then, you <i>cut</i> the fraenulum, you are substantially reducing the sensation of foreskin <i>movement</i>. Now there are a number of people who have a very poor understanding of – everything in general, really – and are fixated on the idea that the glans (head) of the penis is the part that must be stimulated in exclusion of all else. Well, such a <i>limited</i> experience, most people (and it must be said, women particularly) find <i>most</i> unsatisfactory and boring. Most people would say “the more, the merrier” and be keen to accept <i>all</i> options for stimulation.

    In summary, if you cut your fraenulum, you cut your options. If it seems too short, stretch it; be patient, and you will get it however loose you want, but still functional.

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